Wrestling Articles

Getting Past Injury

Every athlete dreads the thought of getting injured.

Many injuries are often preventable and things like warming up and strength training are important ways to reduce the risk of injury even further. But unfortunately, injuries still sometimes rear their ugly head.

January 4 2017

January 4 2017

The first major injury that I overcame certainly came with many challenges but ultimately taught me a great deal about overcoming adversity in sport. On January 3rd 2017, I broke my ankle while training. The next day I received a plate and screws to aid in my journey to recovery. For 3 months I was using crutches and it was about 6 months before I could set foot on wrestling mat.

That time was not all smooth sailing. I struggled with loneliness due to no longer spending time with teammates. More than that, my biggest fear was that I would not be able to return to wrestling.

But ultimately, I can say that my injury experience was a beneficial one that gave me  knowledge just like all of the many ups and downs on the journey of life. Here are some of those lessons.

TAKE YOUR TIME GETTING BACK

The urge to fire a double again may be strong but the best thing that you can do for yourself is to take your time. I’m not blameless in trying to rush my recovery and admit to doing a few push-ups in a cast. In time though, I realized I needed to slow down and give my body time. Our bodies are amazing and have unbelievable capacity to heal. With diligent rehab and patience they will do just that - heal. So be patient, you will be fine.

GOT TIME? USE IT

Wrestling needs discipline . Between after school practice and morning workouts, wrestlers can get a little busy. And while the busyness of something you love isn’t an issue, it is a cool thing to be given time to try new things. Challenge yourself to make the extra time you have meaningful to you. Whether that means straight As, conquering a monster list of must see movies, or making new friends, make it a priority.

FIND YOUR SILVER LININGS

There is yin in every yang and there is a rainbow in your cloud. It is okay to not feel great about you injury but push yourself to recognize what the experience has given you. For me, it was more time with my family and time to reevaluate the pressure I often put on myself. So keep your chin up, you won’t find a rainbow if you’re looking down

LET GO OF YOUR FEARS

Lastly, but most importantly, LET GO OF YOUR FEARS. Your thoughts make or break you. The good new is that your thoughts do not control you, you control them. So let go of your anxieties about not being able to return or not being as good. Think instead about what you can love about your current moment and how strong and able you will soon be again.  Once you do return to the mat, let go of the fear of getting hurt again. When I began wrestling the summer and fall after my injury, I was constrained by the fear of getting hurt. This fear and the guarded wrestling it produced worsened my performance and ironically put me more at risk of injury. Fear like that will never help you. As hard as it may be, forget what happened and move forward.

Take a deep breath. You will be more than okay.

Wrestling helps kids in Cambridge Bay grapple with big issues

Beat the Streets Toronto are so impressed by the powerful work of Chris Cook in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. Chris is using the sport of wrestling to engage and encourage a group of inspirational students to realize their full potential. It's uplifting to hear and see others using the sport of wrestling as a catalyst for positive change.

You can read the full article here:

Wrestling helps kids in Cambridge Bay grapple with big issues

The Other Choice

Much like most of you high school kids in grade 9 in Toronto coming from a Caribbean background I wanted so much to be on the basketball team and be a good basketball player. I was 5 foot nothing and very skilled in the sport of basketball among many other sports. But I was lucky enough to be given a choice, my wrestling coach told me that I could be six man coming off the bench in basketball or I could be a superstar Wrestler where I have a lot more success. Choice for me was very obvious at that point my ego wouldn’t let me come off the bench. The choice may not be that easy for some of you, some of you may be taller than I was, or you may not have a high school wrestling coach that was as good of a person as mine was to sit me down and give me that option and break it down to me, but I just want you to know that there’s another choice.

A lot of you have dreams but I beg you to do the research and see how many people or what percentage of the players actually are successful at their hoop dreams. I want to know that this is not a jab at the sport basketball, I love it, it’s a great sport I play it even now recreationally, but in terms of using the sport to help land you in a successful position after high school or university I beg you to weigh your options because there are a lot of other options. They’re only 12 people selected for a basketball team usually, a team of wrestlers can be comprised of up to 30 to 40 on a given high school team. There is no barrier to entry in other words the sport does not favour the tall, because we have weight classes that separate you from your teammates.

You compete against people your size which makes the playground a lot more fair in terms of natural abilities. The sport of wrestling offers you an opportunity to practice Life skills make, making tough decisions, growing through resistance or overcoming hurdles, it teaches you grit and perseverance. In my humble opinion there is no better teacher for game of life than the sport of wrestling but I do have a slight bias. I wanna encourage you to open your mind to other options, there are many other sports out there that can lead you to that university scholarship, that opportunity to get a job doing the thing you love, the knowledge and skills to become a successful person.

Today I’m happy to do what I love and it started with that one decision back when I was 13 years old. And if you ask me would I make that same decision again, the answer is resoundingly yes. The sport of wrestling is taught me a lot about what it means to be successful, what it means to give back to your community, what it means to be prosperous and what is most important in life. I wish for you the very same, open your eyes to the other options. 

Neal Ewers

Executive Director,

Beat the Streets Toronto

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How does discipline relate to sports

No matter where you go or what you do for a living you will always come across discipline. Now you might be wondering how does discipline relate to sports? Kids don't know when to play and when it's time to get work done and that's okay because kids are supposed to have fun. Sports is the best way to help teach your children some simple discipline skills like getting to practice on time, or not talking while someone else is talking.

Discipline is no fun but that's the point when someone is being disobedient the best way to correct their behaviors is with discipline. You will find the most discipline in sports because sports are all about doing it right. In any sport your kid joins if they’re not doing the techniques right they will not succeed, they’ll get frustrated, and probably even throw a mini tantrum and so that's where discipline comes in. sometimes in order to be successful you have to risk it for the biscuit, you have to be able to make sacrifices and discipline yourself.

Discipline helps you stay active, organized, have more self-control and stay focused. Those skills don't only apply in your sport they can also come in handy at school, work, and even at home. Once someone knows how to be disciplined they gain respect from others because being strict with yourself is very difficult. If you want to reach your goals, being disciplined with yourself is the way to do it.

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Resources

“Why Is Discipline Important | 8 Advantages & Benefits.” Mind Controversy, 4 Mar. 2018, www.mindcontroversy.com/advantages-discipline-life/



Why is Exercising Important for my Kid?

According to the American Heart Association, every child should be getting a minimum of 60 minutes of daily exercise. Research shows that when you exercise your risk of stroke can reduce by 27%. Wouldn't it be lovely to know that your child has a less chance of getting a stroke later in life? As a parent, you want the best for your children. Encouraging your children to do sports can reduce many diseases and increase their health.

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Exercising can prevent many different diseases. Cardiovascular disease is one of them. Cardiovascular disease is the result of the build-up of plaques in the blood vessels and heart. This can occur when you have too much fat building up inside of you. When you exercise, you sweat which burns body fat and releases toxins. Blocked blood vessels can lead to heart disease which in fact, one in every three deaths is from heart disease and stroke.

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I have been engaged in sports since I was 7 years old. I am thankful of that because now as I'm older I feel strong and healthy. Sports can bring many benefits to your child like discipline, combating disease, improves their mood, in my case sports brought a wonderful joy in my childhood. Sports also help build bone density when you're younger and most importantly it helps in developing life skills like organization, discipline, self-confidence, and self-defense.Trust me on this, sports is an amazing way to keep your children active in a positive and productive way. Beat the Streets Toronto has a great program for your children, but I guess you won't truly understand until you try it so without further ado come and join BTST’s sports camp and after-school program.

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Resources

7 great reasons why exercise matters. (2016, October 13).
Retrieved from
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389

Heart Disease Prevention. (2018, July 13).
Retrieved from
https://medlineplus.gov/howtopreventheartdisease.html

How does cardiovascular disease affect the body? | Heart Disease. (n.d.).
Retrieved from
https://www.sharecare.com/health/heart-disease/cardiovascular-affect-body

How to Help Prevent Heart Disease - At Any Age. (n.d.).
Retrieved from
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/How-to-Help-Prevent-Heart-Disease-- -At-Any-Age_UCM_442925_Article.jsp#.W1U41dJKjIU

The Top 10 Benefits of Regular Exercise. (n.d.).
Retrieved from
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/10-benefits-of-exercise#section3









How Combative Sports Build Body Positivity

Involvement in combative sports completely changes the relationship that you have with your body.

Through training, the growing knowledge of what your body can accomplish transforms how you view your body into something positive. You become very in touch with your body, what it needs to perform at its best, what it can do, and what it will be able to do in the future as you get stronger. You fall in love with challenging yourself physically and strive to see those challenges not only met but surpassed.

There is such a healthy environment surrounding combative sports which just radiates with body positivity. Strong role models who love their bodies, who have worked hard and appreciate the strength, agility, flexibility, endurance, etc. that their body has developed. The opportunity to see yourself develop physically gives you something to be proud of, as your body is able to do more and more things that once seemed impossible for you.

As an athlete who has worked so hard to get to the point of health at which you are at then pushes you to healthier life choices. You have worked so hard to get to where you are and you want take care of yourself and your body.

Combative sports cultivate healthy relationships between people and their bodies.






A Step in the Right Direction: BTST Supports Girls Wrestling

New Jersey Adds Girls Wrestling to High School Sports

Women’s Wrestling is definitely on the rise across North America and Beat the Streets Toronto definitely supports the growth of Women’s Wrestling! This is a huge step in the right direction for our friends to the south. Canada Wrestling has long supported the sport and we are proud of the fact that we have girls high school wrestling in all of our provinces!

Way to go Jersey, we look forward to the great many competitions you’ll be hosting in the future as a result of this development!

Neal Ewers,
Beat the Streets Toronto

Why wrestler's make the best employees

We came across this great article by Steve Cooper from Forbes and had to share!  Keep up the good work everyone!  Apparently we make the best employees!!

 

By Steve Cooper, CONTRIBUTOR

Two wrestlers fight for a takedown. Within that takedown are many lessons that can translate into the boardroom. (Photo credit: Available_Light)

"More enduringly than any other sport, wrestling teaches self-control and pride. Some have wrestled without great skill—none have wrestled without pride." ~ Dan Gable

Today's workforce is extremely competitive. When comparing resumes it's easy to get lost in all the bullet points of software literacy and past responsibilities. If you really want to separate two seemingly qualified employees, bring them in for an interview and ask a simple question, "Have you ever participated in sports at an elite level?"

"Current research indicates that individuals who have competed in elite level athletics, i.e., collegiate, international, or professional level competition possess higher levels of emotional intelligence than their non-athlete counterparts," says Richard Mendelson, I.O. psychologist and founder of Dynamic IO Consultants, a consulting firm specializing in human capital management and other services.

In 1996, Dr. William Brad McGonagle, associate vice president for administration at Texas A&M University wrote his dissertation studying how former athletes transfer the skill set they developed through athletics to the workplace. He found that an employee with prior athletic experience was able to transfer the lessons of being a team player and also noticed strengths in accomplishment-based skills, discipline, and communication.

In 2002, professors Daniel Gould and Kristen Dieffenbach published a study in the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology which noted that Olympic champions display higher levels of specific attributes directly linked to success, in particular emotional intelligence. Their research showed that these elite athletes displayed high levels of stress management, interpersonal skills, and self regard.

The conclusion of all this research could be seen during the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, Germany, when American wrestler, Dan Gable, won the gold medal without giving up a single point! This is perhaps one of the greatest Olympic performances of all time. And while this level of performance would be hard to duplicate on any stage, can you imagine this same type of focus and determination on display in your office?

While I acknowledge that nearly all athletes at an elite level have a tremendous amount of drive, wrestlers in particular seem to operate at a higher level of fortitude. Not that my athletic history is anything to write about, but I wrestled in college and have been surrounded by amazing athletes of all sports. I've known Olympians, world champions, college champions and everything in between. The one constant observation is that wrestlers have a capacity to push themselves harder than most and display an unrivaled mental toughness—that and a deep desire to eat.

Socrates once said, "I swear it upon Zeus an outstanding runner cannot be the equal of an average wrestler."

Wise words considering being fleet of foot is how a wrestler starts his day. In the business arena, being fast or strong doesn't necessarily rank as a top priority in our service economy. So why should you care?

"Wrestling, in particular, is thought to require more individual commitment than most other sports due to the nature of the training and competing itself. The logical inference, then, is that with other sports, an athlete can go to practice or a game, and then go home to relax. Wrestlers, due to the weight class requirements, have to maintain their focus and drive around the clock for years at a time," says Mendelson, a former college wrestler.

"In addition, wrestling is an individual sport and the athlete experiences both failure and success as an individual. As a result, the wrestler endures more physical, emotional, and psychological stress, both positive and negative, than an athlete in another sport."

I can tell you that the biggest lesson I learned during my wrestling career was humility. Even the great Dan Gable lost a match. Over the years I learned that getting knocked down was just part of the process to work even harder and to improve. I now encourage the success of others because I enjoy the challenge of meeting those higher expectations. Even during the all-night programming sessions to launch new features on Hitched, it has never felt difficult since I know 100 of those nights will never be as hard as a single wrestling practice.

The competitive spirit in other athletes might argue that they too exude these same qualities at the same level. They might be right, which is why the question you should pose during an interview is asking about their entire athletic background. Saying that, when the bullet points begin to once again merge as you stare down two athletes, I recommend you go with the wrestler.

"Once you've wrestled, everything else in life is easy." ~ Dan Gable

 

To visit the original article, please visit:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevecooper/2012/07/31/why-wrestlers-make-the-best-employees/#1d4c2bbb5f88